Did the Indian Removal Act supported?

Who was in favor of the Indian Removal Act?

Most white Americans supported the Removal Act, especially southerners who were eager to expand southward. Expansion south would be good for the country and the future of the country’s economy with the later introduction of cotton production in the south. Yet, there was still significant opposition to the act.

Why was the Indian Removal Act a good thing?

Native American removal would reduce conflict between the federal and state governments. It would allow white settlers to occupy more of the South and the West, presumably protecting from foreign invasion. … By separating them from whites, Native Americans would be free from the power of the U.S. government.

Who were the biggest supporters of the Indian removal policies?

Answer: The Indian Removal Act was strongly supported by the southern states, where the population was anxious to get hold of vast expanses of uncultivated land occupied by the five civilized tribes. In particular, the state of Georgia, the largest state at that time, was involved in a dispute with the Cherokee.

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Why did Jackson support the Indian Removal Act?

Jackson declared that removal would “incalculably strengthen the southwestern frontier.” Clearing Alabama and Mississippi of their Indian populations, he said, would “enable those states to advance rapidly in population, wealth, and power.”

Who opposed the Trail of Tears?

Opposition to the removal was led by Chief John Ross, a mixed-blood of Scottish and one-eighth Cherokee descent.

How does Andrew Jackson defend his removal policy?

He declared that the only hope for the Southeastern tribes’ survival would be for them to give up all their land and move west of the Mississippi River. Jackson warned the tribes that if they failed to move, they would lose their independence and fall under state laws. Jackson backed an Indian removal bill in Congress.

What was the aftermath of the Trail of Tears?

The Trail of Tears found its end in Oklahoma. Nearly a fourth of the Cherokee population died along the march. It ended around March of 1839. The rule of cotton declared a white only free-population.

What are some possible effects that the Indian Removal Act might have on Native Americans already living in the West?

What are some possible effects that the Indian Removal Act might have on Native Americans already living in the West? The Indians may fight for their land and their would be war. What was the Trail of Tears? The Cherokee’s 800-mile forced march to Indian Territory from Georgia.